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John

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Reply with quote  #16 
The way it was explained to me was that EP's importance was in amalgamating
blues,gospel and country into what we now know as rock'n'roll. His undeniable charisma and plain good looks never hindered,but,unfortunately all of that stuff rolled into a package---and explained--- still does not float my boat.
Amie

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Reply with quote  #17 
O-kee. I'm going to jump into the fray here.  My first 45's were Elvis and Llloyd Price, because my father was a huge fan...and he still is. I kinda "get it" because I grew up with it.  He and I also share a birthday, so my bias is pretty strong.

Elvis was the personification of a movement that was due, and that's why he achieved the status he did, IMHHO.  He was of his time, and the perfect catalyst at the ideal moment in American music.  He didn't need to write the music, he communicated music that had been around, "unheard," for decades. Elvis was probably the single person (because of his background) capable of combining gospel, white country, and R&B into a cohesive style of music acceptable to American radio audiences in 1954. Methinks history chose him...he just chose to sing along and enjoy the ride.

Elvis had a very specific set of attributes: a remarkable talent in his voice; a singular passion for music; a shy emotive nature; an admitted love of Mama, country, and church; and a leg-shaking, unique charisma on stage.  That combination is the only one that could work in America in 1954 (to get this "new" music heard).  He disarmed the critics and conservative blowhards the moment he spoke to them.  It was a sweet subterfuge, involuntary but definitive.  He was unusually handsome, kind, and a poor southern white boy from the projects who grew up singing gospel. He was showing the white masses the beauty and joy (and backbeat) contained in what was then primarily black music.  He made it possible for the white middle-class masses to embrace black music.

So, that's my opinion of why he is still known and respected. Not everyone needs to "get" any musician, though....it's all good.

I'll shut up now. 

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okpeclark

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Reply with quote  #18 
Here's a question for you guys and gals.

There are alot of great musicians that have come and gone,why don't we hear about people hanging out in front of there houses with candles?

John Lennon
George Harrison
Freddy Mercury
Jimi Hendrix
Jim Morrison
Eric Carr

And I doubt anyone will be hanging out in front of Brad Delps house every year with candles,and to me that guy was one of the greatest singers ever.

Dave Mcgrath let me know how the show went last night please????

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Reply with quote  #19 
Paulie wrote
Quote:
There are alot of great musicians that have come and gone,why don't we hear about people hanging out in front of there houses with candles?

Because Elvis kicked down the door, the others followed him in.
Acted/sang in 33 motion pictures, sang/played in 233 mp soundtracks, appeared in 173 TV shows.

No, I'm not a big fan, only liked a few of his songs.   


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John

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Reply with quote  #20 
Now this is a good thread.Well said,Amie,and good point , Sarge.Let's see if anyone else has a hat to throw. I'm genuinely interested in the phenomenon--and of course,as some folk don't 'get' the Beatles, I do,big-time,because I was there,in the same socio-economic cultural explosion that was '60s Britain,but I did not grow up in the USA,hence the fascination.
petew

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Reply with quote  #21 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johan
Now this is a good thread.Well said,Amie,and good point , Sarge.Let's see if anyone else has a hat to throw. I'm genuinely interested in the phenomenon--and of course,as some folk don't 'get' the Beatles, I do,big-time,because I was there,in the same socio-economic cultural explosion that was '60s Britain,but I did not grow up in the USA,hence the fascination.

i guess i can be the other book end. i am fascinated by the British Invasion of the '60s. the Beatles, Stones, Kinks, etc.


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LanceP

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Reply with quote  #22 
I think one reason so many people identify with Elvis is because even with all the money, the fans, the fame and everything else, he was still a Good Ole Boy. He had a mansion, but from the way he decorated the place, you couldn't tell it from a trailer park were it not for the size difference. What many people considered tacky was considered proof that Elvis was still just a guy from the backwoods of Mississippi, and not some pretentious "star".
SergeantDoc

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Reply with quote  #23 

It also doesn't hurt that Elvis served two years in the U.S. Army, serving in Germany and achieving the rank of Sergeant.  It was easier for a kid to get his parents to accept a performer who was patriotic, at least back when patriotism meant something. 


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Maryellen

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Reply with quote  #24 
When I was 13, my mom, cousin, best friend and myself went to see Elvis in New Haven,CT. It was my very first concert, and I wasn't even a fan ~ that was BEFORE I saw him! I was astounded at the love and appreciation he had for his fans. He tried so hard to make everyone happy. Our seats were one level up behind the stage, and every now and then me and my friend would yell "Turn around!", he'd answer"I'm gettin' there darlins'"! And he sang the next two songs facing us! He even knotted up one of his scarves, looked me right in the eye and flung it up to me, though this HUGE mass of a woman hip-checked me out of the way, grabbed it and stuffed it up her shirt!!!!
Needless to say, I didn't get my scarf, and was blazing pissed at that chick, but I was only 13 so...oh well! It was one of his last concerts, he was heavy and pale, but he put on a great show! It was about 6 months later, my friend and I were playing frisbee, and her Dad came home from work. He told us Elvis was dead, and we told him that it wasn't funny to say such a thing. When we saw the news, we cried, we couldn't believe it! In addition to the rest of the awesome reasons others have left, I feel Elvis was appreciated and loved so much BECAUSE of the way he respected and treated his fans. You had to see him in person to really understand, I am really glad I had the opportunity!
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Reply with quote  #25 
I like the part in the movie Forest Gump,where Forest Gump meets Elvis.

I just wonder if Life was like a box of chocolates for Elvis?

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Amie

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Reply with quote  #26 
Thanks, Johan. Again, I don't "get" the appeal of a lot of musicians, but it's all good, all beauty by its own standard, IMHO. Most o'my peers hate Bach and Mozart. Go figure. 

Below is an industry snapshot ("pop" songs changed). The "Elvis influence" can be derived (sorta) from this.  And, you're right, Johan, had I grown up in the UK (or NYC, or LA) in the early 60's, I might understand the Beatles more than I do. Maybe the "Beatles influence" is identical in some ways to EP's.  But, since I'm midwestern, and Daddy was a repressed, pompadour'd, blue-collah Clevelander, Elvis and Jazz surrounded me growing up. Elvis' "second coming" in 1968 from Hawaii (in leathahs for the Moms) was a household holiday. And when he died?  Oy...I can't describe it.  Meh, it's all good...we all find what we truly love eventually. I found classical via ballet, and all my other stuff through radio and friends. 'Tis a bootiful thing.

Some Billboard hits pre-Elvis, 1953...shows where "pop" was:

Patti Page
Doggie In The Window (a #1 hit in adult pop!!!!!!!!)
 
Ray Anthony Orchestra
Theme from "Dragnet"
 
Dean Martin
That's Amore
 
Tony Bennett
Stranger in Paradise
 
Hank Williams
Your Cheatin' Heart
 
Frank Sinatra
World on a String
 
Elvis' first hits, a departure in "pop":
 
That's All Right Mama 1954
That's Where Your Heartache Begins 1955
Mystery Train 1955
Blue Suede Shoes 1955
Heartbreak Hotel 1956
Love Me Tender 1956
Don't Be Cruel 1956
Hound Dog 1956
 
 

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+ A smile is a window on your face to show your heart is at home. (Anon) + The ideals which have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully have been kindness, beauty, and truth. (Albert Einstein) + You use a glass mirror to see your face; you use works of art to see your soul. (George Bernard Shaw)
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Reply with quote  #27 
Elvis oozed sensuality....even on that last tour. Raisin' my hand and testifyin'... this Southern girl was there! Quite a different thing from sexuality.

Some performers bring enchantment onto the stage with them....the Beatles did that too. But not for me.

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Reply with quote  #28 
The Dragnet theme ROCKED!
LadyShade

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Reply with quote  #29 

So did That's Amore... makes me want to hunt up Moonstruck.


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francesco

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Reply with quote  #30 
John,
I've missed both: USA in the 50s and Britain in the 60s... I missed the progressive explosion too in the early 70s (I was born in 1969) but that doesn't stop me to love Beatles and Prog (yes... I'm not so much into Elvis' music too...).
The point is: IMHO there's no need to live a historical moment to appreciate its products. The beauty of music is ageless...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johan
Now this is a good thread.Well said,Amie,and good point , Sarge.Let's see if anyone else has a hat to throw. I'm genuinely interested in the phenomenon--and of course,as some folk don't 'get' the Beatles, I do,big-time,because I was there,in the same socio-economic cultural explosion that was '60s Britain,but I did not grow up in the USA,hence the fascination.


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