The Official John Wetton Website Guestbook
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 3      1   2   3   Next
moonlightingmom

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 108
Reply with quote  #1 
No, not the movie, which I saw on a cross-Atlantic flight this summer.

This past weekend, the family was driving from Wisconsin back home to New Jersey. It's about 1000 miles, and is one of two 1,000 mile trips that we do in about 5 weeks every year. I swear in my next life I'm going to be a tour bus driver.

Anyway, we were listening to the iPod, and Without You came on. I commented that I thought the song was sad, and when we got towards the end of the song where there is a church bell (my husband argues that it isn't a church bell, but a gong), I wondered if the subject of the song has died. My husband didn't say anything to this, but kept driving. At the very end of the song, the music goes from being very melancholy to somewhat optimistic sounding. Thinking aloud, I said, "Do you think that the music there is representative of the afterlife? Now he really doesn't have to be without the subject of the song?"

I got a look from my husband that implied that I'd totally lost my mind. (Johan, if I'm totally off the mark, go ahead and say so. It would give my husband great pleasure to know that I'm trying too hard with this song.)

Keep in mind, I'm the comparative literature major, and I'm always fussing with what the songs say. My husband is the former head boy in the men and boys choir, and is the real musician--but doesn't pay attention at all to the lyrics.

When you listen to songs, do you pay more attention to the lyrics, the music, or is it a real blend of both?



Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #2 
"Never be alone without you"
I think those are my favorite Asia lyrics.
Even though you are without someone, you aren't alone if
you keep precious memories of them. They are always with you.
"Memory that I keep"  "Both of us will know"
If that song doesn't make you cry, nothing will.

my second favorite lyrics  are:
"and though we never even met, no talking needs to be done.
The hum of conversation will disolve you into me"


ModernKaveman

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,261
Reply with quote  #3 

Probably some of the most jarring realizations in my life come when a song that speaks to me musically and then you listen closer and think about the lyrics and you realize that the song describes you speficially.  Sometimes this is a good thing and sometimes a bad thing.  It is almost like a prophet has spoken to you and in reality they have.  Nothing happens for nothing, maybe that's worth believing.


__________________
The real world is a great place to begin


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #4 
All music is open to multiple interpretations.  And if the writer tells us what
the song means to him, then it could ruin it for those of us that interpreted it
differently. 
As the listener, what we get out of the song is what is important.

jonberg

Registered:
Posts: 271
Reply with quote  #5 

I hear the music first and it's usually later that the lyrics begin to dawn on me as far as any literary meaning. Only after learning JW is also a recovering alcoholic did the lyrics to "Ride Easy" take on a different dimension. "...this journey ends before it begins..." Any 'blackout' drinker knows the truth of that! I usually look to be dazzled by the musicianship first, though, and then examine the lyrics...


__________________
"I know I must treat you the way that I'd be treated"
"How can I contribute if I just don't try?"


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #6 

Music is a powerful thing, it can make you, it can break you even take you apart. You just have to be careful not to take it too much to heart.

John

Avatar / Picture

Super Moderators
Registered:
Posts: 11,732
Reply with quote  #7 
For me,it has to be a complete picture of music, production and lyric in equal importance. I think you are doing just great at interpretation without my help, but
I'll tell you this--the answer is in the title,and it is a bell, matching Wildest Dreams' ending.
ModernKaveman

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,261
Reply with quote  #8 
Funny.  I remember after the ASIA show in Orlando this summer my brother and I mentioning the "bells" of WY and WD and wondered if there was a connection.

I agree a bit with the "interpret things on your own" idea, but hearing what Johan's inspiration for Open Your Eyes was doesn't diminish the deeper meaning it has for me personally... and I am sure for Johan too, no?  I suppose listening to OYE for 20 years and taking it as a part of my life it is hard to deviate to anyother meaning for me personally.

__________________
The real world is a great place to begin
AudioSlave

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 922
Reply with quote  #9 

Johan's deep emotional stuff, to me, is his & Geoff's iCon material.  I wonder if those songs were difficult/challenging to write?


__________________
"Don't try to stop me...I am a professional!!!" -- DAVID COVERDALE
"NO! We are not an English rock band...We are albatross salesmen from Huddersfield" -- IRON MAIDEN
WHALE~OIL~BEEF~HOOKED


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #10 
OMG! It's tres cool that someone else made the connection between the bells in Without You and Wildest Dreams. I can remember, clear as a bell (tee-hee), sitting at the Asia show in June and wondering if perhaps those bells united the two songs in a significant way. Hats off to Modern Kaveman!

If I may be self-indulgent for a spell, I hope you'll all wish me luck tomorrow. I have a second call back for a Tide detergent commercial! Such is the life of a thespian.
moonlightingmom

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 108
Reply with quote  #11 
This is reminding me of my college seminars...

We would have very long, drawn out conversations about "authorial intent." Does it matter if you interpret something differently than what the author intended? Some authors go to great lengths to prevent you from having any other interpretation, like George Bernard Shaw, who had very extensive stage directions. (I would be hard pressed to think of a way that a musician could have this much control over his work, but maybe I'm wrong...)

Is it art if it doesn't speak to you? (Leo Tolstoy would say no.) We spent hours talking about this. Scintillating conversations, to be sure, but I'm sure my parents were banging their heads wondering how it was going to prepare me for the real world. Now that I think of it, I'm not sure it's done much for me other than make me oh-so-fascinating at parties.

Anyway, VERY cool to learn of the link between the two songs. That will give me something to chew on!!!

One other example of musical treatment that I thought was just brilliant is Boys of Summer by Don Henley, where there is a section that sounds to me like the plaintive cries of seagulls. I've always thought that was pretty clever and cool.

John

Avatar / Picture

Super Moderators
Registered:
Posts: 11,732
Reply with quote  #12 
It's kinda hard to imagine any deeper meaning to "Food,glorious food',or "If I were a rich man", isn't it? "If I could talk to the animals"? ----That could have possibilities.
moonlightingmom

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 108
Reply with quote  #13 
You make a good point, although I have seen The Cat in the Hat turned into a Homoerotic tale of terror (that was just wrong).

Didn't Gwen Stefani just re-do If I was a Rich Girl with the same tune?

I should dig out my old copy of What is Art by Tolstoy. I'm curious as to how he might have felt about people re-creating pieces and changing the timbre of the piece, as we see so often today when music is sampled and in theatrical productions (like Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice being performed in a Nazi concentration camp).

But we digress from the original topic.

Last night, my husband and I sat poring over the lyrics to Without You. I kept arguing, "She's died! Look--he's dreaming, and he wakes up, and he's without her..." He would respond, "No! She's alive, and she's just cheating on him, and he's lonely." Back and forth we went. It was comical.

Actually, I've been thinking about bands that use unusual sound effects in their music. There is a newish band called Guster, and their percussionist usually plays the bongos. In one song, Barrel of a Gun, he uses a typewriter. It's a cool choice given the subject matter of that song. Definitely more obvious than the church bell, but still neat.



Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonlightingmom


Last night, my husband and I sat poring over the lyrics to Without You. I kept arguing, "She's died! Look--he's dreaming, and he wakes up, and he's without her..." He would respond, "No! She's alive, and she's just cheating on him, and he's lonely." Back and forth we went. It was comical.

Actually, I've been thinking about bands that use unusual sound effects in their music. There is a newish band called Guster, and their percussionist usually plays the bongos. In one song, Barrel of a Gun, he uses a typewriter. It's a cool choice given the subject matter of that song. Definitely more obvious than the church bell, but still neat.



  Just because someone is gone doesn't mean they died. 


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #15 
"Didn't Gwen Stefani just re-do If I was a Rich Girl with the same tune?"

Yes, off her first solo album. My daughter was noodling around humming this song one day so I told her it was from a Broadway play. She said I was fibbing so I dug out an old cast album from the basement...You know, Tevye, Lazar Wolf, Topol, Zero Mostel...

Never heard the song again. I must have made it dreadfully uncool.

Oi Vey.

JK
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.